But, Blackie … Is That Thing Street Legal?

March 12, 2018 at 9:58 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Some folks may wonder what sort of car Chester Morris drove in Columbia Pictures’ series of Boston Blackie b-movies.  After reading the following article from the March 2, 1969 edition of The Orlando Sentinel, you still really won’t be able to answer that question … but it sounds like an amazing machine:

I can only wonder what has become of this unique vehicle in the almost 50 years since this article was published.  I haven’t found any references to it around the internet, but hopefully someone out there has restored Blackie’s crazy custom ride to all its glory.

**UPDATE**      While reporter Bill Gentry connects the car in his article to Chester Morris’ Boston Blackie films, I believe he may have gotten his facts somewhat muddled.  The photograph accompanying his piece and his description of the vehicle’s low-riding rear boasting three fins evoke memories of the car driven by Kent Taylor during much of the second season of Ziv Productions’ syndicated Boston Blackie television series.  Multiple episodes are available on YouTube, for those curious enough to check it out.

JBF  –  3/14/18

Advertisements

Permalink Leave a Comment

Tune in for Boston Blackie …

February 29, 2016 at 8:13 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Richard Kollmar is the performer most associated with portraying Boston Blackie on radio, holding the distinction of having played the role more times than any other actor in any medium.  But in its earliest incarnation, as a 1944 summer replacement series on NBC, the Blackie radio program was an extension of the Columbia Pictures series of b-movies, and brought Chester Morris to the airwaves to reprise his starring role from the silver screen.  The following piece from the June 16, 1944 edition of The Bluefield Telegraph is one of the earliest announcements of Blackie’s transition to radio:

Bluefileld Telegraph 6-16-44

Amos ‘n’ Andy eventually came back from vacation to reclaim their spot on NBC, but Boston Blackie wasn’t about to relinquish his status as a radio sleuth.  Under the auspices of Ziv Productions, the series remained in production until 1951, and available in syndication well beyond that.  Not bad, for a character created nearly 40 years earlier.

JBF  2/29/16

Permalink 1 Comment