No. 6606’s Last Bow

September 19, 2016 at 8:12 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

In honor of mid-September, with summer slowly slipping into autumn, here’s a seldom-seen bit of advertising from 102 years ago this very month:

thiefs-daughter-ad

This bit of vintage promotion comes from the September 26, 1914 issue  of The Literary Digest, hyping (among other things) the last of Jack Boyle’s original quartet of Boston Blackie stories.  “A Thief’s Daughter” was the final yarn to bear Boyle’s No. 6606 pseudonym, and the first appearance of Blackie’s beloved Mary.  With illustrations from N.C. Wyeth, the tale made for an excellent final bow to Boyle’s American Magazine readers.  It would be another three years before Boston Blackie would surface again, in the pages of The Red Book.

JBF  9/19/16

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Blackie & Mary’s Screen Debut

August 9, 2016 at 9:11 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Over the years, many performers have portrayed Boston Blackie and his beloved Mary, in media ranging from cinema to radio to television.  First seen in illustrations for the pages of The American and The Red Book magazines , the “first couple” of the underworld was given form by artists such as N.C. Wyeth and W.H.D. Koerner.  But the first flesh and blood pair to bring the characters to life on the silver screen were Bert Lytell and Rhea Mitchell, in Metro Pictures’ 1918 production Boston Blackie’s Little Pal.

Rhea Mitchell & Bert Lytell

the screen’s original Blackie & Mary

Lytell looks appropriately suave and dashing in the role of Blackie, with Mitchell a fine image of Mary.  And director E. Mason Hopper’s cinematic interpretation of the Red Book tale seems to adhere closely to Jack Boyle’s original plot (as evidenced by this item from the September 14, 1918 issue of Exhibitor’s Herald):

Exhibitors Herald 9-14-18

Lytell would play Blackie again in the 1919 offering Blackie’s Redemption, but that production saw actress Alice Lake assume the role of Mary.  However, her performance in Boston Blackie’s Little Pal endows Rhea Mitchell the indisputable title of cinema’s first Boston Blackie’s Mary.

Mary & Blackie pic

JBF  8/9/16

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The Heart of Boston Blackie

March 23, 2016 at 9:38 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Heart of Boston Blackie

This announcement from the July 21, 1923 issue of Camera! is puzzling, and just plain wrong on several levels.  Laura La Plante was the female lead in a Boston Blackie production from Universal in 1923, but it was most certainly not a serial.  And Miss La Plante did not play Mary.  And the film was not titled The Heart of Boston Blackie.  And it was not based on a story from The Red Book Magazine.  Oh, and it didn’t feature any of the actors mentioned as candidates for the role of Blackie.  So just what was this film that Camera! tried almost in vain to promote?

By late summer of 1923, newspapers and magazines ran a number of items about Laura La Plante’s upcoming appearance in Universal’s Boston Blackie film The Daughter of Crooked Alley, but by the time it was released to theaters on November 7, 1923 its title had been shortened to simply Crooked Alley.  This early item from Camera! makes it sound as though the film was based on a story in The Red Book, also titled “The Heart of Boston Blackie,” while most other press promoting the film claimed its source was Jack Boyle’s popular magazine tale “A Daughter of Crooked Alley.”  In actuality, no magazine ever published such a story by Boyle.  Crooked Alley’s scenario was adapted from an original story written expressly for the screen by Jack Boyle.  And though Laura La Plante was the film’s female lead, she played Noreen Tyrell (as Blackie’s Mary is noticeably absent from the film).  Finally, though Herbert Rawlinson did star in a Jack Boyle inspired drama — Stolen Secrets — in 1924, he never played Boston Blackie.  In Crooked Alley, that role went to actor Thomas Carrigan.

Though Camera! went far wide of the mark in announcing this production, today Crooked Alley is one of only two Boston Blackie movies from the silent era known to have survived in its entirety.  A print is held in the film archives of the University of California Los Angeles, and it was was screened at the 2002 UCLA Festival of Preservation.  Perhaps one day it will be made more widely available to modern day fans of Jack Boyle.

JBF  3/23/16

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The Problem of the “Answer in Grand Larceny”

September 28, 2015 at 10:08 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

A number of Jack Boyle’s Boston Blackie stories are companion pieces.  That is to say, while each stands on its own as a story unto itself, several build upon the preceding yarn in the series, to present an initial story and a sequel.  Prime examples of this are “Black Dan” (which tells a story in which Blackie ends up in prison) and “The Water-Cross” (which relates his subsequent escape).  But perhaps the two most readily apparent companion pieces from the Boston Blackie canon are the Red Book Magazine tales “A Problem in Grand Larceny” and “An Answer in Grand Larceny.”  The first tells of a daring shipboard heist committed as an act of revenge, while the its sequel relates the moral dilemma Mary faces as a result of the crime’s aftermath.  The pair are excellent examples of Blackie and Mary in fine form, but some reflection on the stories’ background presents us with a puzzle.

Obviously, the titles “A Problem in Grand Larceny” and “An Answer in Grand Larceny” are meant to fit together, to link one story to the other. However, previous research has indicated that “A Problem in Grand Larceny” was, in all likelihood, not the name Jack Boyle gave his story.  Correspondence from the Red Book editorial staff cites the title “Queens of Camouflage” (see my June 3, 2015 post, “Black Dan Pays,” for further details).  So, if there was no “Problem in Grand Larceny,” it seems unlikely that Boyle would have titled his sequeThird Degree 1l “An Answer in Grand Larceny.”  If this is the case, what did he call his story?

Short of locating his original manuscript, it’s unlikely that anyone can provide a definitive answer to this question at this late date.  However, one source presents a strong possibility.  “A Problem in Grand Larceny” never saw publication in overseas magazines and newspapers, but outlets in the U.K., Australia, and other countries did reprint its sequel.  Intriguingly, another name was chosen for these foreign printings, christening the story “The Third Degree.”  It’s hardly surprising that, without the “Problem” title as a set-up, the overseas market did not want to use the “Answer” title for their republication.  But is it possible that their choice of “The Third Degree” was actually Jack Boyle’s original title?

On the subject of alternate titles, it’s worth mentioning there is yet another tied to this pair of stories.  In 1922, scenarioist Albert S. Le Vino adapted “A Problem in Grand Larceny” and “An Answer in Grand Larceny” into a single screenplay for the Famous Players-Lasky Corporation.  The result was the silent feature Missing Millions, starring David Powell as Boston Blackie and Alice Brady as Mary.  And this film was subsequently released in Brazil under the title Digna do Meu Amor (Worthy of My Love).  With so many titles in the offing for these stories, Jack Boyle himself may well have been hard-pressed to recall which was his original.

JBF  9/28/15

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Blackie’s Mary of 1923 – Alice Brady

August 10, 2015 at 10:13 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , )

MM ad 7-8-22

Boston Blackie has had many faces over the years, brought to life by more than a dozen different leading men.  But his steadfast wife Mary has had a number of different incarnations as well.  This week, we’re spotlighting Alice Brady, who starred in the in 1923 feature film Missing Millions (a production which is actually more Mary’s story than Blackie’s).  Based on Jack Boyle’s Red Book Magazine tales “A Problem in Grand Larceny” and “An Answer in Grand Larceny,” the film casts Miss Brady opposite David Powell as Boston Blackie.  Alice Brady trade ad 1922

 

JBF  8/10/15

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Blackie’s Redemption (1919)

June 15, 2015 at 1:00 AM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Blackie's Redemption 2In April of 1919, at the same time the publisher H.K. Fly was releasing their hardcover collection BOSTON BLACKIE, Metro Pictures Corporation debuted the second of two feature films in which actor Bert Lytell portrayed Jack Boyle’s most famous character.  Titled BLACKIE’S REDEMPTION, the movie was a re-imagining of the popular Red Book Magazine story “Boston Blackie’s Mary,” with a detour through Boyle’s later tale “Fred the Count.”  Alice Lake co-starred, as the steadfast Mary, though in this version of the story she and Blackie were not yet wed.  The basic storyline of this re-invented tale can be gleaned from the following synopsis, derived from the reviews in Moving Picture World (April 26, 1919) and Photoplay (May 1919):

Boston Blackie, a crook so clever that no one can “get” him, has determined to go straight.  Fred the Count, a cowardly crook, cracks a safe and comes unbidden to Blackie’s supper of farewell on the eve of his marriage to Mary, a worthy girl.  The police hear of the robbery, come to the eating place and search everyone.  The Count slips a pearl pin into Blackie’s pocket and this is found.  Mary pledges to wait for Blackie, despite his very bad prospects, and meanwhile, to keep the villainy going, the Count tries to sway her affections, but fails.

At San Quentin prison, Warden Sherwood receives Blackie with grim satisfaction.  Time passes and Blackie, having become ill, is placed in the Hospital cell.  With the aid of Squirrel, a half-wit convict, he breaks jail one stormy night and goes immediately to Mary.  The police are notified and Sherwood finds him there, disguised as an old woman, mourning over a dummy that they tell the officer is Blackie.  At an opportune moment, Blackie draws his gun and places it against the Warden’s head, and tells him that he hates to kill a man as brave as he is, but that he couldn’t trust him not to bother him.  Blackie’s sense of fairness predominates and he gives the Warden a chance for his life, telling him that in two minutes by the clock they will reach together for their guns and the quickest hand wins.  Mary looks on panic-stricken.  Blackie grabs his gun and levels it at the Warden, who stands still, looking fearlessly at him.  Blackie demands that he defend himself.  Sherwood calmly says “no.”  Blackie, with the cry of a broken and beaten man, throws his gun on the floor, saying “You have beaten me, Warden.  I couldn’t.  I will go back with you.”  Mary is relieved that he did not kill the man.  Blackie holds out his hands for hand-cuffs.  The Warden looks into the grief-stricken faces of Mary and Blackie, and calmly tells them that he is sorry to have disturbed them; that he was looking for an escaped convict, but the man he wanted is not there.  The men look understandingly into each others eyes and shake hands, and the Warden goes out and reports to the waiting men that it was a cold trail.

In the meantime, Blackie’s old pal, Sober, reports that Fred the Count has framed up a job to rob the pay-roll of a lumber company.  Blackie and Sober go up there, open the safe, scatter money all over the floor, and when Fred the Count comes in they knock him out and also the constable, then they handcuff Fred to the constable.  And Blackie and Mary leave for Honolulu on a deferred wedding trip.

Redemption ad This alternate version of “Boston Blackie’s Mary” sprang from the pen of screen scenarioist Finis Fox, who the following year scripted Metro Pictures’ ALIAS JIMMY VALENTINE (based on the short story “A Retrieved Reformation” by O. Henry).  Moviegoers in 1920 may have felt some deja vu, as ALIAS JIMMY VALENTINE starred Bert Lytell, and featured a climax in which the detective chasing the title character experienced a change of heart and let his quarry go, after deciding that the criminal had become a changed man.

JBF 6/15/15

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Boston Blackie: Complete and Uncut (At Last!)

April 13, 2015 at 1:00 AM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Since passing into the public domain, the 1919 “novel” BOSTON BLACKIE has been reprinted numerous times in the early 21st century.  Available in digital, print, and audio editions (often at little or no cost), the seven stories it encompasses are the most familiar portion of Jack Boyle’s body of work.  And yet, anyone who has read it will not recognize the following scene, missing from the Blackie canon since its publication in 1917:

 

A pallet was spread on the floor in the Mission attic in which Boston Blackie, university graduate, safe-cracker and escaped convict, had taken refuge after his flight from San Gregorio Penitentiary.  On it lay Blackie, a block of wood supporting his head Chinese-fashion, while his long, deft fingers rapidly toasted oozy drops of opium into nut-brown smoking-pellets.

The room was in darkness save for the dim light shed by a tiny opium lamp covered by a conical tin chimney.  The smoker’s fingers, twirling the sizzling pills on a yen hok in the slender shaft of light above the lamp, cast gigantic shadows on the walls and ceiling – grim, fantastic, strangely shaped shadows that seemed a visible expression of the troubled mind of the man beneath them.

Boston Blackie was oppressed by an unreasoning but insistent sense of impending trouble and unseen danger.  His mind, keen, alert and supernormally intuitive, sought in vain to place the intangible menace.  Often, it seemed, his mentality, projecting itself into the darkness about him, almost reached and drew aside the black curtain that hid the lurking mystery.  But each time the unrealized vision faded and left him staring at dancing, meaningless wall-shadows.  Suddenly, unbidden and unconnected with any conscious thought, a picture gripped his mind.  He saw a shadowy figure, bound hand and foot and standing alone on a raised platform with head and face hidden by something dark and sinister.

“The black cap of the hangman,” he whispered, twisting uneasily on his pallet.  “This has been a strange day and a stranger night,” he thought.  “Trouble hangs in the air.  To-day was to have seen Mary and me safe at sea, with fear and danger forever behind us.  By every possible human computation of chances, we should be.  But night finds us still here in a world of enemies.  And thoughts of a hangman haunt my mind!  Why?  Chance!  There is no such thing.  Something holds us here for good or evil – evil, probably.  Well, if it must come, let it.  But it’s hard on Mary.  Poor Mary!  Poor little girl!”

Boston Blackie and Mary, partner of all the hazards of his life, had taken passage for Central America on the steamer Colon.  In his own country Blackie was a man with a price on his head – an escaped convict.  For days he and Mary had waited for the hour of the Colon’s sailing – Blackie with keen impatience, Mary with the fierce longing of a hunted creature seeking refuge for herself and her mate.  Almost on the hour of departure a steam-pipe had burst in the Colon’s engine room.  Two days would be required for repairs.  It was on the first of these that Blackie now lay on his pallet twirling pellets of opium, while a sixth sense warned him of danger still to be met. 

An hour passed.  The shadows still danced on the wall and ceiling.  The pills still hissed and bubbled in the heat of the tiny flame.  A step sounded on the stair.

“Mary at last!” exclaimed Blackie in tones caressingly tender.

 

This *lost* sequence from “The Woman Called Rita” is just one example of the deleted material lurking within the pages of THE RED BOOK MAGAZINE, excised when Boston Blackie was converted from periodical to hardcover publication.  While the 1919 book played a crucial role in making Blackie accessible to a readership for many decades, it also ensured that Jack Boyle’s original, unexpurgated texts were all but forgotten.  Virtually no one has read the full-length versions of “Boston Blackie’s Mary,” “The Woman Called Rita,” “Fred the Count,” “Boston Blackie’s Little Pal,” “A Problem in Grand Larceny,” “An Answer in Grand Larceny” and “Alibi Ann” in almost 100 years.

With that in mind, I’ve taken pains to return to the original magazine texts in preparing my upcoming volume, THE COMPLETE BOSTON BLACKIE.  Much the way that films are often given an extended director’s cut these days, I’m working to present Jack Boyle’s extended author’s cut of these not-so-familiar stories.  So, if you’ve read BOSTON BLACKIE (or even the more recent collection BOSTON BLACKIE & FRIENDS), my volume will still hold more than a few surprises for you.

JBF 4/13/15

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Jack Boyle at a Glance

April 6, 2015 at 1:00 AM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

Much has been written here about Jack Boyle as the creator of Boston Blackie, all peppered with various hints and intimations about his checkered history.  But who was he, and why was he so uniquely suited to write the tales of the underworld which brought him such success in his lifetime?  While this subject could cover entire volumes, let’s take a look at the highlights of Boyle’s life at a glance.

Jack Boyle was born in California in 1881, somewhere in the vicinity of Oakland and San Francisco.  He grew up around Santa Clara, and in his early adulthood became a newsman and reporter (following in the footsteps of his father and grandfather, who had both published newspapers in the 1800s).  Beginning around 1900, he was employed by various papers in San Francisco, and by 1907 had worked himself into editorial and managerial positions.  However, his professional success took a toll on him, and around 1909 he became a habitual user of opium, to combat the stresses of his job.  His habit soon became an addiction, which quickly spelled the end of his journalistic career in California.  His professional disgrace was followed by a rapid spiral into a life of crime, in order to feed his continuing opium craving.

By 1914, Boyle had run afoul of the law on multiple occasions, and had served prison sentences in both California and Colorado, on a variety of charges from forgery to armed robbery.  While serving out a sentence near Denver, he began writing stories from his prison cell.  These proved to be the first tales of his criminal hero Boston Blackie, and they were picked up for publication in THE AMERICAN MAGAZINE.  Late in 1914, Boyle was released from prison, and returned to working in the world of newspaper and magazine writing.  In 1917, he revived Boston Blackie for a new series of stories in THE RED BOOK MAGAZINE, and these tales found a strong following with the reading public.  The following year, his work continued to appear regularly in RED BOOK, and Boston Blackie came to the silver screen in the first of many feature films to be adapted from his adventures.  Soon the popularity of these features opened the door for Boyle to embark on a new career as a Hollywood screenwriter, while still producing fiction for nationally known magazines.  In just a few short years, Boyle had gone from drug addicted felon to successful and celebrated author.

However, to paint Boyle’s story as one of disgrace to triumph is a lopsided portrait, at best.  While it’s tempting to view his rise from the shadows of a prison cell to national prominence as a success story, the reality is far less black and white.  The entirety of Jack Boyle’s career is a strange mixture of success and scandal.

In truth, there are indications that his 1914 release from prison was acquired under false pretenses, and his subsequent activities in Denver culminated in his fleeing the state within a matter of months.  His February 1915 arrival in Missouri was no less turbulent, with Boyle being arrested in Kansas City just days after taking up residence there.  Despite his rocky start in the community, Boyle managed to establish himself in the city, securing a reporting position with THE KANSAS CITY POST, and setting up housekeeping with a woman named Violet.  During his time in THE POST’s employ, he traveled to Iowa gathering story material, and became embroiled in some questionable dealings relating to the investigation of a set of ax murders in the town of Villisca.  Boyle’s time in Kansas City ended as scandalously as it began, when he was arrested in January 1917, accused of running an opium den.  While legitimate speculations can be made about the veracity of this charge, and the possible political motivation behind Boyle’s arrest, what cannot be argued is that Boyle ultimately skipped bail and fled to Wisconsin.

With wife Violet in tow, he settled in the Baraboo, Wisconsin area in the summer of 1917.  At this point, he shifted his primary professional focus away from journalism, concentrating more on the production of fiction for popular magazines.  It was during this period that he renewed his acquaintance with editor Ray Long, and began contributing frequently to THE RED BOOK MAGAZINE.  The years of 1918 to 1920 were a time of prosperity for Boyle, with the popularity of Boston Blackie (both in print and on movie screens) reaching international proportions.  He continued publishing frequently in RED BOOK, but also signed a contract in 1919 to write Blackie stories exclusively for THE COSMOPOLITAN MAGAZINE.  His writings were also seeing print in newspapers and magazines overseas, and Hollywood was purchasing the screen rights to much of his output.  The world wanted to hear the stories that Jack Boyle had to tell.

But by the end of 1920, his fortunes started to shift.  While his career roared along full-steam, things in his personal life began to disintegrate.  In April, Boyle signed a mortgage on a second home, a ranch in Colorado, and in June he and Violet decided to spend the summer at their new property.  Sometime during this holiday, things turned sour.  Boyle separated from his wife around January 1921, leaving the taxes on the ranch unpaid, and moving to New York.  In July, Boyle officially lost his ranch to foreclosure, and the following month Violet filed for divorce from him in the Colorado courts.

Spending a year in New York, Boyle met and married a woman named Elsie Thomas, and moved to Los Angeles sometime in 1922.  While he continued to write for the magazine market, his move to the west coast also marked his leap into the world of screenwriting.  Spurred by the film industry’s continuing interest in adapting his magazine stories, Boyle began writing original scenarios directly for the studios.  However, in the summer of 1923 his new Hollywood life was thrown into turmoil, with the arrival of his first wife, Violet, and her claims that their divorce had never been finalized.  Over the next year, she publicly decried him as a bigamist, and made repeated demands for a financial settlement to complete their divorce.

Despite his success at transitioning into work in the film industry, scandal continued to plague Boyle throughout his Hollywood years.  In August 1924, he was arrested for passing bad checks in a Los Angeles grocery.  He had further run-ins with the law over the frequent escapes of his pet – a full-grown bear – which ran loose through the north Hollywood suburbs.  In September, newspapers reported a violent argument between his two wives, which ended in Elsie giving Violet a severe beating.  In October, Violet again filed for divorce from Jack, and Elsie was temporarily committed to a psychiatric ward after several unsuccessful attempts to kill herself.  Finally, in November the California courts awarded Violet her divorce, ordering Boyle to pay her one hundred dollars a month in alimony.

Around 1926, Boyle moved from Hollywood to a home in nearby Hermosa Beach. His magazine output had slowed over the previous years, though sporadic stories bearing his byline continued to appear while he pursued his work as a screenwriter.  But by ’26, even his screen assignments began to thin.  In 1927, he and Elsie moved back to New York, taking an apartment in Greenwich Village.  He was still reported to be dabbling in screenplays, and in December he published his last short story for RED BOOK.

Late in the summer of 1928, Boyle and Elsie took an extended trip back to the Pacific coast, where he engaged in some work as a publicist for the Oregon State Democratic Committee.  Late in the night of October 15, 1928, he suffered acute kidney failure in a hotel room in Portland, Oregon, and died just three days shy of his 47th birthday.

So ends the strange and sordid tale of Jack Boyle (or at least a thumbnail sketch of it).  Of course, Boston Blackie remained a popular subject of movies, radio and television shows well into the 1950s, with the character even seeing a minor revival in the 21st century as the protagonist in a pair of graphic novels.  But where Blackie has endured, Boyle has largely faded into obscurity.  Which is a shame, because in many ways his life was even more interesting than the yarns he wrote.  My upcoming book, THE COMPLETE BOSTON BLACKIE, will include a far more in depth look at the life and times of the author.  But in the meantime, be sure to check back here for further glimpses into the colorful life of Jack Boyle.

JBF 4/6/15

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BREAKING NEWS … An Exciting Boston Blackie Discovery!

March 26, 2015 at 8:12 PM (Uncategorized) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , )

How many Boston Blackie stories did Jack Boyle publish?  This has been a point of contention for years.  H.K. Fly’s often-reprinted 1919 collection presented seven Blackie tales, which for nearly a century were the only specimens of Boyle’s writing available in book form.  But when this volume was republished by Gregg Press in 1979, Ed Hoch’s introduction to the new edition pointed out that further Blackie exploits were chronicled in the AMERICAN, RED BOOK and COSMOPOLITAN magazines.  Ultimately, examinations of these periodicals brought to light another fourteen Blackie yarns, increasing the series’ total count to twenty-one.  For years, this was thought to represent Boyle’s complete output on his most celebrated creation — until the advent of the internet.  In the 21st century, research online revealed a “missing” Blackie story, serialized in THE LOS ANGELES TIMES five years after Boyle published his last story in THE COSMOPOLITAN.  This curtain call to the Boston Blackie adventures was eventually reprinted in Coachwhip Publications’ 2012 collection BOSTON BLACKIE & FRIENDS, definitively setting the count of the complete Blackie saga at twenty-two.

Until now.

I’m thrilled to announce the discovery of not one, but TWO hitherto unknown Boston Blackie stories, both from the pen of Jack Boyle.  The pair, written in a period during which Boyle’s literary output had primarily turned away from his rogue hero, has languished for more than ninety years in the pages of a publication not typically associated with the author.  Through a kindness of Providence, their existence was discovered in time to allow for their inclusion in my upcoming collection THE COMPLETE BOSTON BLACKIE.  Of course, preparing the texts for publication will mean a further delay in a project that is already behind schedule, but I’m happy to run beyond my original deadline if it means presenting all twenty-four installments of the Blackie canon in their entirety.

And speaking of the Blackie canon in its entirety, let me go on record to confirm that ALL of Jack Boyle’s published Blackie stories do still exist.  Some speculation to the contrary has arisen on Amazon’s pages reviewing Coachwhip’s BOSTON BLACKIE & FRIENDS.  At least one post on that site postulates that the stories “The Poppy Girl’s Husband” and “Miss Doris, Safecracker” may be lost to the crumbling pages of magazines originally considered a disposable medium of entertainment.  Thankfully, such speculation is incorrect.  I have located copies of both tales, as well as an alternate version of “The Poppy Girl’s Husband,” based on Jack Boyle’s original text but re-imagined by an entirely different author.  There’s always the possibility that another unknown story could surface, but there is no danger that any of the currently known Blackie stories is “lost.”  My goal is to have the complete collection available in both print and digital editions by the end of 2015.  Stay tuned for further details …

JBF  3/26/15

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